About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
. they expect the supreme court to be the ultimate decider for the nation. >> it would be the roe v. wade of our generation. >> reporter: they have their critics, conservative legal analyst ed whalen. >> there is nothing in the constitution properly construing that remotely supports a right to same sex marriage. >> reporter: and even some of those who agree with olson and boies say that same sex marriage should be left to the states. there are lots of skeptics out there who say you're going too quickly here, and you're asking the supreme court to do a pretty heavy lift. >> every civil rights struggle, there have always been people who said you're moving too fast, country is not ready for it. how many people in 1954 were saying, country is not ready for desegregation, brown against board of education, too soon. >> reporter: but everyone says this is a conservative court. why are you doing it now? >> because ted is a conservative guy. there are lots of conservative people, the idea that civil rights and human rights is exclusively a liberal preserve, i think it is flat wrong. >> reporter: their cl
. when roe v. wade was decided abortion was legal in only four states. you look at the numbers on gay marriage. 1996 compared to today. in 1996 27% of the country thought gay marriage should be valid. by 2012 it's 50%. as someone who works closely on this issue, what do we owe that almost sea change in public opinion to? >> i think a big -- the recent sea change, i think a lot we owe to president obama, his leadership. i think he particularly, the african-american community, i think his speaking out on this has made a big deal. the other thing i think that's made a big deal is the visibility of gay and lesbian people. the more -- the court is not immune to that. the more people meet gay people as their clerk oorz family members or their friends or neighbors, the more they realize that this notion that they shouldn't be able to get married, which is a deeply conservative institution, the idea that two people can't love each other and get -- be in a stable relationship, which is family values, it's ridiculous. that's why we have people like ted olson who is, you know, a very conservativ
of the same-sex marriage issue. that might result in what would essentially be the roe v. wade of gay rights. >> thanks for that. >>> back to you, molly. you were doing a big piece of this for "the atlantic" for next week. what did you find most interesting in your research thus far? >> the really amazing thing about this issue is how far public opinion has come in a relatively short time on the scale of sort of large-scale social change. when gallup recently polled public opinion on gay marriage, it had the support of 53% of the american public. back in 1996 that was 27%. and that was the atmosphere in which president clinton and the congress were passing the defense of marriage act. since then, every single appellate court that has considered it has ruled against it. that's something that advocates feel very confident about the supreme court going their way. on the proposition 8 case, advocates are a little bit more nervous. this is a conservative court. and if they do rule against proposition 8 and gay marriage in california, that would strike a blow against gay marriage that could last f
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)